Good News!

Advocate, Community Participation, Disability, Down Syndrome, Education, Inspiration, Siblings Add comments
Jane and Billy Schulz heard good news about Rosa's Law.

Jane and Billy Schulz heard good news about Rosa's Law.

U. S. Senator Barbara A. Mikulski from Maryland announced that her bill introduced to eliminate the terms “mental retardation” and “mentally retarded” from federal education,  health and labor laws passed the Senate on Thursday night by unanimous consent.

This is big!

For months people have been blogging, emailing, and twittering about the misuse of the “R” word. If you would like the background and my response to this effort, you may look at my earlier blog on the “R” word.

Called “Rosa’s Law,” the bill changes the phrase “mentally retarded” to “an individual with an intellectual disability” in health,  education and labor law. Senator Mike Enzi, a co-sponsor of the bill, states that “The bill is simple in nature but profound in what it will do when it is enacted. For far too long we have used hurtful words like ‘mental retardation’ or ‘ MR’ in our federal statutes to refer to those living with intellectual disabilities. While the way people feel is important, the way people are treated is equally important. Rosa’s Law will make a greatly-needed change that should have been made well before today – and it will encourage us to treat people the way they would like to be treated.”

The passage of this law does not guarantee that people will cease to use pejorative terms to describe those who have disabilities, but it is a start. Local and federal agencies will be required to use the new term, as will school personnel. I remember, as a special educator, having to inform parents that their child had been identified as having mental retardation; I also remember their reactions. I hope that this new term will be kinder and more readily accepted. However, there will always be a need to insure that children with disabilities of any kind are treated with respect, regardless of the label used.

I think the most important aspect of this law is the way it was initiated and voted into law. The inspiration for the law came from the actions of a family whose daughter, Rosa, was diagnosed with Down syndrome and labeled retarded at school. The mother teamed up with other parents and her state delegate to introduce a bill to change the terminology in her home state law. A hearing on the implications of changing the law was held prior to consideration at the Maryland  General Assembly.

At the hearing, the testimony that had the greatest impact was given by Rosa’s 11-year-old brother. He said “What you call people is how you treat them. What you call my sister is how you will treat her. If you believe she’s ‘retarded,’ it invites taunting, stigma. It invites bullying and it also invites the slammed doors of being treated with respect and dignity.”

This story is a perfect example of effective citizen advocacy, according to Senator Mikulski. She said that this family “pulled together to pull us all to another way of thinking. They fought for the respect and dignity of a loved one. The more than 6 million people with intellectual disabilities in America deserve that same respect and dignity.”

A similar bill has been introduced in the House and has 63 co-sponsors. The law does not affect any services, rights, responsibilities or educational opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities.

There is no end to what we can accomplish when we pull together!

Do you think this law will make a difference?

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